• By Malia
  • August 5, 2015

Allure Magazine Afro Controversy: Cultural Appropriation or Admiration ?

Allure Magazine Afro Controversy: Cultural Appropriation or Admiration ?

634 916 Malia

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The August issue of Allure Magazine has been the talk of the town since it release, due to a very controversial article on how Caucasian women can achieve an afro on their naturally straight hair.  Titled: You (Yes,You) Can Have An Afro *even if you have straight hair* , pictures a white woman with obviously manipulated, textured hair, demonstrating what they believe an afro looks like. The article even goes into detail on how this demographic can achieve the “look.”

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This article created outrage among African-American women because for one, they didn’t use a black woman to represent this so-called trend, two they didn’t bother to give readers the history of the Afro, and how important it is to black culture, and three many perceived the article as just plain ole’ cultural appropriation. Oh, and need I not forget that the style isn’t even an Afro, its a Twist-Out!!!!

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After all of the backlash on the article, here is what Allure had to say:

The Afro has a rich cultural and aesthetic history. In this story, we show women using different hairstyles as…individual expressions of style. Using beauty and hair as a form of self-expression is a mirror of what’s happening in our country today. The creativity is limitless — and pretty wonderful.”

Okay, I get that, but they still didn’t touch on the fact that the history extends from the African-American culture.

Personally, I’m not upset that they chose to shed a light on the Afro as a trendy hairstyle, but I do believe that if they wanted to be most authentic and not offensive, then they should have used a model that was more appropriate.  I’m not against other races experimenting or rocking hairstyles that are most known to my culture, but I do have a problem when people don’t give credit to the source.

But, hey that’s just my two cents! What are your thoughts?!?

Xoxo

Malia

Images: Twitter/ E News/ Allure

Malia

ITS LIT!! Malia Brown is the creator of UrbanSocial and Natura magazine. She is the former college ambassador for ESSENCE, a Journalist, and an on-air personality. Malia is a recent graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and she reports on beauty, pop-culture, political affairs, and race relations.

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